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Artemis Vision builds repeatable, tested machine vision systems for automated quality control and optimization for manufacturing and logistics. Our proven solutions address needs in the automotive, pharmaceutical, medical, defense, building materials, and energy industries, among others. We work closely with our customers to test solutions at every step along the development process, so that the theory is realized in a proven system both of us can stand behind. Once systems have been built, we can also work with you to link to your current IT and SPC environments, so you can utilize the full value of your solutions and use the data to improve your process. We help your company save money, time, increase reliability, and decrease liability.

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I am looking for a camera or video system that can be displayed to a Monitor. I would like to have a bulls eye or some sort of target system to be displayed on the monitor that can zoom in or out to focus. The purpose is to put a small pin through a hole. Thank you.


Bill, I think it depends on to what extent you want a DIY project. If you buy a camera from a vendor with a basic SDK they'll likely have video viewer sample code. I know Basler and the Imaging Source do. To implement zooming and draw the target I'd do it in software. You can stitch in an external library to your application and leverage that code. I'd suggest OpenCV or Emgu CV (an OpenCV wrapper) to do that heavy lifting.

You could build it yourself or you could hire us (or someone else) to do it. For basic zooming and a target, it'd take a software guy about 5 days to put together in C++ or C#. You'd likely want to modify and rebuild OpenCV or Emgu CV to always put your target in the middle of your zoomed image.

You could also buy something more off the shelf like John suggests below and set that up. I really don't know if the exact product you want exists though. If it's a fixed station you need something by Scienscope could work.


Tom Brennan
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

Most examples I have seen for use of vision systems in inspections are for repetitive manufacturing operations or first piece inspections. Are vision systems capable of being used to verify mixed parts of multiple types and configurations at a rate of multiple parts per minute? Specifically trying to identify and qualify the components yielded from disassembling complete goods for remanufacture. So challenges are that the part being examined may have wear or damage, but we still need to be able distinguish which part it is and whether it should be re-used.


Duane, That is possible. The system would need to be programmed to recognize a critical feature on each part, and then perform a set of inspections based on which critical feature was found. I don't know exactly what parts you have, however let's say you had gaskets of various sizes you wanted to check for cracks, and couplings you wanted to check for wear and cracks and fuel valve assemblies you wanted to check for completeness. A system could be programmed to recognize certain gaskets and look for edges and irregularities (cracks), recognize certain couplings and measure wear (thickness) and recognize a fuel valve assembly and check each component was in the proper place.

One place you may run into issues is scaling this up as each part and the corresponding inspection(s) would have to be programmed separately. How many different potential parts are you talking about? Feel free to call or email.


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

Would like to know if vision based inspection is feasible for large parts and assemblies like axles of a truck. What we are looking to inspect is the "toe" of the stub axles as theses come out of the assembly line. "Toe" is the relative inclination to each other. These stub axles are pivoted at either ends of the main axle and tied to a bar by means of a threaded rod and nut assembly. If you may please let us know, we would appreciate your help. Thank you.


Sanaulla, It sounds like the overall assembly is large but there are two smaller areas of interest. If this is the case your best solution is likely a two camera system. One camera aimed at one "toe" and other at the other "toe". A vision inspection running on a nearby computer would analyze both images and output the difference in the two alignments along with whatever else you needed. That said, we'd need to see pictures of the toe, the alignment to be measured and have some idea of the precision you need. Let me know if we can help you out. In general large assemblies aren't a problem, it's the size of the "area of interest" relative to the defect that matters most. If there are multiple areas of interest far apart from each other a multi camera system is likely best.

Tom


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

Hello, I have a GigE camera from THE IMAGING SOURCE and I need to build a program in c++ in Linux that can communicate with the camera, change settings ( iris and exposure time ), capture an image and saving it to a specific place. Firstly I need one library to do my job and secondly I will need some help building the program.


Marios, This is something we could write for you. We've built a handful of custom camera viewer applications for other customers.

We also have a GigE vision viewer we've built. We've not used it with Imaging Source GigE cameras but as it's a common standard it should work equally well.

Tom


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

I have a number brand new LED machine vision lights that I would need to sell. I have numerous ring lights (including dark field), spot lights, Light lines, coaxial, and diffuse dome illuminators. I would prefer to sell the whole lot for a bargain price. Does anyone have a suggestion as to who might be interested or where I might be able to sell them?


Carl, We're always interested in expanding our machine vision lab. What do you have? Can you send pictures and a list?

Thanks,

Tom


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

Hello, I am looking for way to photo id different anode blocks. In identifying the blocks, I also need a way to Quality control the anode blocks (detect them for cracking, discoloration, and spalling). I am not very well versed in this field so any advice would be greatly appreciated.


Greg, If there are more than two or three types of blocks the easiest way to ID the blocks is going to be by adding a barcode or datamatrix to the blocks (if that's possible). This will also give you downstream serialization and traceability. Pattern matching and Identification via vision can get finicky when there's a lot of variety. Do you have any pictures of these blocks you can share as far as the other defects? Depending on the pictures I would recommend shipping samples to 1-2 integrators for some testing and take things from there.


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

Hello Vision Experts, I am looking for a very professional System Integrator for visual inspection of integrated circuits. Which System Integrator in the US do you recommend? Thank you in advance.


David,

AIA offers professional certifications to integrators. I would select someone who has received an advanced certification and ask for customer references.

We'd hope you'd select us, but anyone on the list of Advanced integrators can help you.

Tom


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

I am looking for a vision inspection system that could be mounted outdoors (on bridges for example) looking at the surface of a flowing water body to measure invasive plant fragments that are flowing by the camera. The measurement does not have to be absolute quantity, but some relative measurement of the "flux" of fragments in the frame. This is for use in measuring the effects of invasive plants infestations flowing from streams into lake water bodies. Do you have any recommendations for a vision inspection system?


Mike, Are there other types of green plant matter flowing through and the system needs to distinguish invasive from non-invasive? Alternatively can the system detect green matter and apply a rule of thumb for how much is likely invasive?


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

I am looking for a system that would inventory similar wooden products and identify them according to distinguishing features - such as wood grain. Any products out there that would work on this scale?


Jana, How many different products are to be identified? Would the device need to be handheld or are these products in board form on a conveyor?

We'd be happy to talk through a solution directly. I'm not aware of an off the shelf product.

Tom


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111

I am a concrete construction quality professional active in many industry associations, but I know very little about image capture and analysis. I am looking for a combination of hardware and software to measure voids in concrete surfaces after the formwork is removed. Our industry currently has only subjective measurement of surface to void ratios and color uniformity; both important aesthetic attributes. I would like to build a device to capture images under controlled lighting and reflectance, and then use software to determine void / surface ratio and color uniformity. Several white papers have been written on this subject using Matlab or ImageJ for analysis of greyscale images, but the devil appears to be in the details - controlling variables.


John - This sounds like an interesting problem that would likely need an engineered solution. Would the end goal to be to get to a handheld unit an operator could use in field or would this unit analyze specimens taken to a lab.

To do accurate color analysis we'll want to use full spectrum white light. For the voids a low angle of light could be best as that's typically used to pick up scratches, dents and other non-uniformities in surfaces. We'd probably also need to come up with a calibration to make sure we're providing consistent readings over time.

Happy to discuss further. These are always interesting problems to talk through. Send me an email or call at 303-832-1111x101.


Tom Brennan - President
tbrennan@artemisvision.com
(303) 832-1111