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A typical project for ARC Specialties begins when a customer goes to the company with a manufacturing problem. Working with the customer, the staff will propose a solution. In some cases, ARC needs to prototype the system before a complete proposal is possible. In the ARC research facility, a full testing and technical setup allows the technology services staff to work with tools from stereo lithography welding systems to racecar camshaft welds. Frequently, this ability to develop a process before a full-blown manufacturing system is built will allow ARC to improve the final machine and shorten the delivery time. ARC Specialties builds on three basic platforms, programmable logic controllers (PLC), machine tool controller (CNC) and 6 axis robots. The ARC6 robotic welding robot is one of the last remaining robots designed and build in the USA. No one technology solves all manufacturing problems. Generally ARC will choose a PLC if given a process problem. PLCs are fast and reliable—when the motion requirements exceed that of a PLC, ARC selects a CNC controller. When ARC is presented with a problem that requires 6 axes of motion, the company will use an articulated arm.

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Industry:
Automotive and Automotive Automotive , Automotive , Building Products/Materials , Consumer Goods/Appliances , Fabricated Metals , Metals , Military/Defense , and Robotics

Application:
Arc Welding Arc Welding

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The Fabricator: Artificial Intelligence Pipe Welding System From Arc Specialties Combines AI, Sensors, and Cobot

POSTED 06/19/2019

ARC Specialties has developed the Artificial Intelligence Pipe Welding System (AIPW), which incorporates the 6-axis UR5 collaborative robot arm from Universal Robots to carry out full-penetration, single-sided, V butt pipe welds. The robot arm is portable but allows full freedom of motion for the laser scanner and welding torch.

The system prescans the root opening (gap) using a 2D laser, then uses the data to generate the robot path and welding parameters. It compensates for gap variations by changing oscillation, torch position, travel speed, and welding conditions.

The robot arm positions the torch over a tack weld to start the arc to help ensure 100 percent root weld acceptance. Fill and cap pass programs fill the groove using user-selectable weave or stringer bead welding techniques.

Collaborative Robots This content is part of the Collaborative Robots curated collection. To learn more about Collaborative Robots, click here.