Ask the Experts

Member Since 2012

LEARN MORE

SEARCH QUESTIONS

Back to All Questions

Ask a Question

Viewing Answers from experts at Universal Robots A/S

Show Per Page:

Now displaying: 1-10 of 11 questions

How many people can be in the safeguarded space for each available teach pendant? Does everyone in the space need an enabling device?


1 person per enabling device. Each person is to have an enabling device UNLESS there is complete and total safeguarding such that there are NO risks to people.

Make sure that you know the span-of-control of the enabling device(s). It is possible that they ONLY control a portion of the hazards. The safety standard requires that the enabling device control (have ability to stop) all hazards to which each person, with the enabling device, would be exposed.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(844) 462-6268

Regarding redeployment of an older robot into a new system the RIA R15.06 1999 standard is pretty clear stating that as long as the robot was to standard when it was manufactured, it does not need to be upgraded. The rest of the system needs to be to the most current standard. Unfortunately, the 2012 standard does not specify anything about redeployment as far as I can find. Is the 1999 standard still valid? Is this spelled out in another standard or TR? If so please advise where I may find it.


The 2012 standard only addresses NEW. RIA issued a Technical Report to address the issue of existing robots, existing systems and changes. I suggest you get RIA TR R15.506.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(631) 610-9664

If I have a robot with a failsafe control unit, but it is not specifically a power and force limited model, can I myself build the necessary speed and torque limits into its motion to allow it to be used in a power and force limited operation?


The robot manufacturer has to answer this question. I presume it is Yaskawa because of the name "FSU".

The robot manufacturer has to state whether they have safety functions for the purpose of power and force limiting.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(631) 610-9664

We have several robotic palletizing cells. Each cell has a variety of case sizes that are being brought into the cell by roller conveyor. Some of our cases are large so the openings through the perimeter fencing are large enough for a person to crawl through if they got onto the in-feed conveyor. According to ANSI/RIA R15.06 - 2012 is there a safety standard that dictates what level of safety we need to have at these in-feed openings?


Please look at R15.06:2012, part 2's ANNEX titled "Safeguarding material entry and exit points"


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(631) 610-9664

Hi. We are a robot integrator and also we design the robot cells(mechanical/guarding and electrical/safety circuits). I understand how to do the risk assessment part, but I'm confused about the checklists Part 1: Annex F and Part 2:Annex G of ANSI-RIA R15.06. We once hired a professional safety assessment firm on our behalf, and they only completed Part 1:Annex F. But we are now going to do our own assessments, and I feel as though we should be doing both. Any suggestions from another integrator/OEM? Do you fill out one of them or both? Thanks in advance.


The Part 1 Annex is for robot manufacturer. The integrator completes Part 2 annex.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(631) 610-9664

It is permissable to guard a robot using only a laser scanner to detect operator approach and stop movement or is a barrier (such as a fence) required?


The safety laser scanner is sufficient. Perimeter safeguarding would then be provided the the scanner making a guard not required.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
+8444 (626) 268-1004

I am a safety specialist and I am trying to find any recommendations/requirements related to a robot brake test and the periodicity of such a check? I know the new KUKA robots come with an installed brake test. I write safety specifications and I am just trying to set some criteria. I would like to do more than just say "comply with the manufacturer's requirements for periiodic brake tests" if possible. Any thoughts or help would be appreciated.


This question is really left to the manufacturer's recommendation combined with policy within the user facility.

If the robot has stopping time and/or stopping distance limiting safety functions, then brake testing is not required at all because the monitored is done by the robot safety control system.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
+8444 (626) 268-1004

FANUC - "Stop position prediction". Hello, can you tell me what this DCS option is used for? We have a supplier who uses this option on the robot in a fully cage scenario, no collaboration with any human. This option increases the footprint inside of the cell to allow the robot to run at full speed. We want this supplier to not use this option, but they feel it is needed for the safety and to prevent the robot from crashing through the fence in an abnormal situation. Any info on this feature would be greatly appreciated!


You need to ask Fanuc about this feature. Standards do not address particular make of robots.

I suspect that using this capability ensures compliance with the R15.06 mandatory requirement that the restricted space be within the safeguarded space.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
+ () -

I have a Daihen OTC AX robot cell with 2 robots and 2 controllers on it. My issue is when you press the E-stop on the each pendant or start box on either unit it does not go into E-stop but my external E-stops do work fine. Any Ideas?


Contact Daihen.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(000) 000-0000

You come across a stress wrapper that is locked out. You see two employees working on it with their hands point of operations.. What should or should not be done?


This is not a robot.

A general statement about lock-out: If a machine is locked-out in accordance with OSHA 1910.147, work can be done with hands in the point of operation. However keep in mind that compliance with lock-out means that all sources of hazardous energy have been released and/or contained and secured such that there are no hazards due to hazardous energy and its affects (including movements).

As previously answered (I see Shawn Mozzani's response below), additionally these people would be both trained and authorized for this activity.


Roberta Nelson Shea - Global Technical Compliance Officer
rns@universal-robots.com
(000) 000-0000